The Cosmological Consequences of General Relativity

In 1917 Einstein published a paper entitled Cosmological Considerations of the General Theory of Relativity. The title is significant.  Unlike Galileo, Copernicus, Kepler, Brahe and Newton, Einstein was concerned with the entire universe, not just the solar system.  Calculating the orbit of Mercury to predict its movement around the sun was hard enough, but Einstein had the audacity to attempt to predict the movement of stars and galaxies.  In order to do this he had to make an assumption.  His assumption, known as the cosmological principle, is that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous.  This means that the universe looks pretty much the same in every direction, and that it looks that way from whatever vantage point in the universe you have.  This means that we do not occupy a special place in the universe.

When he applied his theory to the universe, the result was unsettling to say the least.  General relativity predicted that the universe was destined to crash in on itself as a result of gravity’s relentless pull on the stars and galaxies.  Newton’s theory had predicted the same thing.  In the early 20th Century, the view of the universe was that it was stable, that it had always existed more or less as it is today.  But Einstein’s prediction was that things would start creeping slowly toward each other.  The creep would turn into a frantic dash as stars and galaxies collided.

Anxious to make general relativity consistent with the observed and accepted notion of what the universe is, Einstein realized that if he introduced a constant, which he called the cosmological constant into general relativity, he could keep the result from being a huge crunch at some point in the future.  The cosmological constant was a sort of anti-gravity that repelled matter, offsetting the natural attraction of gravity just enough to prevent collapse.  It was, in essence, a fudge factor similar to that found by proponents of Newton’s theory of gravity who were unwilling to accept general relativity.  Even Einstein was somewhat ashamed of the need for this fudge factor, saying that it was “detrimental to the formal beauty of the theory [general relativity].”

Most scientists were content to accept the cosmological constant as a “refinement” to general relativity because it made the theory fit with their notion of the universe.  Remember we began with the adage that things are what they are and if the theory doesn’t explain them we better get a new theory.  No one wanted to jettison general relativity after having just adopted it.

No one, that is, except Alexander Friedmann, a Russian scientist born in 1888.  Friedmann would tackle orthodoxy head on and come up with a radically different view of the universe, one that would not be confirmed for decades.

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